Carolina Fish Talk Forums banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,906 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Fishless cycling is the process of cycling a tank, or establishing a biological filter in a fishless aquarium.

Simply follow the step below to do a fishless cycling.

1. Set up your tank and keep the filter running at maximum capacity throughout the cycling process. Do not change water during the cycling process. Also, buy a water test kit.

2. Add about 4 to 5 drops per 10 gallon of PURE ammonia daily. Make sure you get pure ammonia with no other chemical in it.

3.Continute to do this daily until you see nitrite on your test kit. Lower the amount of ammonia to about 2-3 drops/gallon per day after you start seeing nitrite on the test kit. Remember to test your water at least once every 2 or 3 days.

4. Keep adding 2-3 drops/gallon of ammonia everyday until you see ZERO ammonia and nitrite on your test kit. (You should start seeing Nitrate at this point)

5. Once your test kit reads zero on both Ammonia and Nitrite, your tank is consider cycled. You can start adding small amount of fish in there.

PS. Tank can cycle faster on higher temperature, but make sure the temperature does not exceed 80F.
Use graval, decoration or media from established tank can also help speed up the cycling process.

source
http://www.algone.com/fishless_cycling.htm
 

·
Harmless Detrivore
Joined
·
1,832 Posts
I think the referenced article is only intended for fresh water.

So I agree with you - don't do this in a SW tank. If you need an ammonia source (which you don't if using live rock), then add a cocktail shrimp to the water.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,190 Posts
Well, that's not strictly true, because if you buy liverock from a store it is supposed to be already cured. Only raw liverock is going to produce ammonia. :-k

I have a question though, please exuse me freshwater folks for my ignorance. I tend to run screaming from tapwater, but my question is:
Why add ammonia? Tapwater already has ammonia in it.......why not just um, wait for the ammonia already in there to cycle out? This seems simple to me, but perhaps there is a reason not to do this? Tapwater here tests for around 1.5ppm for ammonia already, because we are on Raleigh city water.....again sorry if I am just being dumb but I had to ask! Totally not questioning the experience level of freshwater folks on here surpassing my own! (Now, if you want to dump some salt in there we'll talk! \:D/ )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
Tap water doesnt have that much ammonia in it to get a cycle going....tested it just the other day....(I was on a roll after testing my tanks) city of raleigh tap water was 2.5 ppm

I've never used "bottled" ammonia to cycle fw, just have done it with fish food same as sw.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,190 Posts
2.5ppm ammonia (whoa worse than mine) should get you nitrates of a level that you may even need to do a water change before adding fish......let me research on this and I will post back. Thank you for posting back, I was starting to think there was no freshwater folks left in here, and I have been looking for Jpatter to post, I was SURE he would have something at least........
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,190 Posts
I have heard this is good for freshwater before....I like to keep a general knowledge of freshwater and I feel like I'm missing a lot of stuff here lately on prefered method of cycle......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
EvilEmpire said:
When I did FW I just used bio-spira to do my cycle
I finally found a place locally for this, how did it work out for you?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
I'm still not so sure about bio-spira.........instant fix in a fish tank normally doesnt work so well....but then I've never used it
I like cleaning out my old filters into a new cycling tank along with adding old water change water both from an established tank....this seems to cut cycling time down a lot..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
I have had never had fish loss w/ bio-spira...its the impatient cycle way. Athough I do wait a few days to put fish in...not just throw them in after putting it in the tank.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,190 Posts
"Identifying precisely which species of bacteria are responsible might not seem urgent--— except that there are products on the hobby market that claim to have packaged the bacteria in question. Use of these canned bacteria is claimed to "jump-start" the nitrifying cycle in a new aquarium. Even if this is possible, it appears that sometimes the wrong strains of bacteria have been chosen! In March 1998, an Aquarium Frontiers article by Tim Hovanec compellingly reported for hobbyists the relevant published scientific research, a lot of it done by Hovanec himself. Hovanec and his co-workers have established that the bacteria traditionally identified as responsible for nitrification are not present in significant numbers in freshwater aquaria. The freshwater bacteria converting nitrite to nitrate, for example, appear now to be Nitrospira. "
Thought you might like to see that, guys! Came across it in my research on the rate at whick ammonia converts to nitrate. In fact, the whole page was good......here it is.....

http://www.skepticalaquarist.com/docs/nutrient/nitcyc.shtml

I am still looking for the exact rate, yet I am going to make a guess that if you already had 2.5 ppm ammonia in your water you would end up with nitrates of about 50ppm, which should be too high to want to put any fish in!
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top