Carolina Fish Talk Forums banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ive got a 150 g im thinking about drilling but not sure. Anyone done this?
I know the bottom is tempered it has the sticker but what about the sides?
I have never used an overflow box how are they to use? is it a good option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
It comes down to personal preference,There are pro`s and con`s with each if the tank is drilled for overflows,the can be noisey,if not designed properly,and you have to make sure they are designed to handle the amount of water you will be returning to the tank..An overflow box that hangs on the frame of the tank,If designed properly can be quite,and and the manufacturer tells you has how many gallons an hour it can handle right on the package,You can move it around the tank to suite your needs,depending on the flow through them or lack of,they can lose siphon ,So if you go with a siphon box try to stay away from u tubes,or cheaply designed units...hope this helps
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,108 Posts
If it's a standard tank the sides shouldn't be tempered. Like Regal said its all personal preference and what you want to see when you look at your aquarium. Most prefer a drilled tank because it gives it the clean display look that most are looking for. With the tank drilled most of the equipment goes in the sump and under the stand, so you won't have any wires, HOB equipment, and heaters visible. Also with a drilled tank you will increase your total water volume (most say the more the better).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,496 Posts
It is personal preference but I will say I've had two overflow boxes and my current tank is the first drilled tank I have owned and will never go back. It is extremely quiet (far more then any boxes) and I have a much greater piece of mind knowing it is IMO less likely to get blocked and I never have to worry about a siphon restarting after a power outage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
If you decide to have your tank drilled,Normally on the inside of the tank most people use a 90 elbow the water will over flow the elbow and the water goes to the sump..On the elbow you might want to put a strainer of some kind that will allow the water to leave [drain] from the tank,The reason being that snails have been known to cover or enter the 90 with bad results.......Some people use gutter guard,or perforated pipe to keep things from clogging or covering the inlet....Try to stay away from anything that will restrict the flow of water...A little strainer,would be worse than no strainer at all...Think of a algae sheet covering it,,,the bigger the openings the better..........I hope that makes since to you
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,190 Posts
Is this going to be a reef tank? Wouldn't use bio- anything for a reef...unless it is a bio-logical cycle! Hardee-har-har...but nah, seriously, bioball/wheels/rings...that's for fish only systems without liverock. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
626 Posts
If the tank is not currently running, you should seriously consider getting it drilled and set up with an internal overflow, etc. However, if it's up and running, that's a different story. Tearing down a tank to get it drilled means you have to find somewhere to stash the livestock, keep the live rock going, worry about the bio cycle, etc. etc. etc. I did see one post on here once about drilling a tank on the fly (so to speak), but it's not something I'd want to try.

I think the hang-on overflow box is the best option to put a sump on a tank already running. I did this about two years ago with help from Marine Depot (great advice, great people, never even got a hint of attitude from them). I use a CPR overflow with an aqualifter pump. The overflow instructions say the aqualifter is optional. It's not! Do not hook up an overflow of this type without one. You need it to get the siphon going in case of a power outage. The aqualifter costs about $15 so I also keep a spare. I've run this system for a couple of years with no major problems or floods (knock wood). In fact, I prefer it in some ways (takes up less room in the tank for starters and it's easier to clean). You can rig something called a "gurgle buster" to quiet the overflow if it's too loud. I tinkered with mine until it's virtually silent. Just like with pumps, etc., I take the whole thing off and soak it periodically so that it stays clean and free-flowing. Been absent for at least two long power outages and it started on its own with no problem. I think overflow boxes often get a bad rap from reefers. And, if you're starting from scratch, then a reef-ready tank is the way to go. But there's no reason you cannot run a successful tank with a hang-on overflow if it's properly installed and maintained. Just do your homework and learn how the system works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,013 Posts
Definitely drill. You will be fighting a losing battle the entire time you have the tank set up if you don't drill. You will not be able to run appropriate filtration for a tank that size hanging off the back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Lobsterofjustice,If you read the post,no one was saying anything about hanging a bunch of equipment on the back of the tank,If you read the post you would find out that both ways have the equipment in the sump,,The poster of this question was looking for advice for drilling or if there was an alternative to drilling the tank,and if so what are the pro`s and con`s of the different methods........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
Lobsterofjustice,If you read the post,no one was saying anything about hanging a bunch of equipment on the back of the tank,If you read the post you would find out that both ways have the equipment in the sump,,The poster of this question was looking for advice for drilling or if there was an alternative to drilling the tank,and if so what are the pro`s and con`s of the different methods........
The OP did ask about HOB Bio-filters...... Thanks for all of your "reef knowledge" and sharing, but please try to turn the Type-A down a bit. We are all on here to share knowledge. Not to drum down others opinions.

Remember, There are a thousand ways to run an aquarium. Each person has to find their own way that works for them.

That said, OP: I believe that you would have an easier time maintaining the tank should you decide to install an overflow system, whether or not you drill the tank. More water volume makes chemistry easy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Poolshark8961,Thank You,You are also being as you put it,Type A,You have not added anything to the conversation that has not already been said or implied.. thank you for the heads up with "Reef Knowledge"..If the other person would have been offended by my comment,I would have told them that I am sorry,Nuff said..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
626 Posts
I should stay out of this, but with due respect to all concerned, I have seen large tanks run with only hang-on equipment. It takes skill and (I think) nerve, but some people do it by installing a skimmer, refugium, reactor, etc. all without a sump. That said, if you are setting up a tank for the long haul, you will likely be concerned with aesthetics and a sump allows you to keep a lot of equipment and electronics out of sight. To my mind, that's the main advantage. Related question: Seems to me that reefers (myself included) are sometimes fiercely defensive of their setups and methods. Wonder why that is....
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top