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ok it depends

When I was in London for a month it was when the mad cow disease was really big there. I went all that time with out eating beef and the last day I went tot the market and got me a fat steak and people in the market was yelling at me your gonna get mad cow mad cow etc etc I figured if I was going home the next day I am gonna take the chance if I grow 12 utters and have 2 more legs then I would know what was wrong .

So yes if I wanted it bad enough. Just so you know that month in London I was a vegetable girl. They have their meat on the sidewalk in boxes and the chickens still have feet and heads
 

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Yes. Technically it's the same cow.
 

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Can we make them with extra ribs?
 

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Thats the most biased BS I've read since reading about HR45 just a few minutes ago(If you don't know what that is look it up). I searched all over the site, and cannot for the life of me find where I can vote to drink milk from cloned animals. Its not like theres anything wrong with the animal or milk from it, its just got the same DNA as another cow. Danm Hippies
 

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Sure, I'd eat meat/drink milk from a cloned animal. There's no difference in the quality, safety, etc. between them affected by cloning, just like there's no difference in quality, safety, etc. affected by twining. If two cows are born as twins, there's nothing about the twinning that makes them any better or worse to eat/drink milk from than any others. The same goes for cloning.

Fear over cloning is, IME, related entirely to the "yuck factor". It's an emotional response not grounded in...well, anything but emotion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I was curious what you all think. I was surprised by the reaction of a lot of people in that video. When my wife told me about it I said yuk, but thought about it some more scientifically and basically came to the same conclusion as most everyone here.
 

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johnett said:
ok it depends

When I was in London for a month it was when the mad cow disease was really big there.
I spent 6 years in Germany as a kid- For that reason the American Red Cross has deferred me from donating blood for the last 7 years or so. Due to Creutzfeld-Jacob Disease. I'm O-, so I donated consistantly from the age of 16 to 26, so if I was going to pass on my mad cow disease, it's been done LOL But now, I'm deferred.
 

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JoeCreature said:
Yes. Technically it's the same cow.
well---- not really.

Just like with Dolly (the sheep) the clone ages faster. Back when I was in college, I could rattle off which proteins are being inhibited and why, and how it affected the aging process, but I just can't remember any more. But, the clone ages faster and dies younger. Period. And it's not that the clone "starts life at the age of the original." It is an aging process.

So, do I want that in my body? NOPE
 

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Ok, I responded before reading more of the posts, so now, I need to add one more :) Sorry!!

I'm not a liberal, hippy, organic girl- but, kids are developing faster. It's not unusual for a 10 year old girl to begin menstruation. This is a direct result of the steroids in our foods. Would I eat cloned anything, no way.

Back to Dolly, even though she died of cancer, her telomeres were short (which is indicative of advanced age) at half her life expectancy, and also suffered arthritis.

There are lots of links to learn more about it, but here is just one that I found quickly. A more scientific approach is available, but this is an easy read. With time and further experimentation on other clones, it was determined that the telemeres being short were not due to her genetic donor being 6 years old as the original assumption stated. It's the tip of the iceberg. What don't we know?

edited to add link:
http://www.crystalinks.com/cloningsheep.html
 

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Blitzburggirl said:
Ok, I responded before reading more of the posts, so now, I need to add one more :) Sorry!!

I'm not a liberal, hippy, organic girl- but, kids are developing faster. It's not unusual for a 10 year old girl to begin menstruation. This is a direct result of the steroids in our foods. Would I eat cloned anything, no way.

Back to Dolly, even though she died of cancer, her telomeres were short (which is indicative of advanced age) at half her life expectancy, and also suffered arthritis.

There are lots of links to learn more about it, but here is just one that I found quickly. A more scientific approach is available, but this is an easy read. With time and further experimentation on other clones, it was determined that the telemeres being short were not due to her genetic donor being 6 years old as the original assumption stated. It's the tip of the iceberg. What don't we know?

edited to add link:
http://www.crystalinks.com/cloningsheep.html
Ok... you've officially changed my mind. I don't want to eat cloned anything and I don't want my daughter to start menstruating next year either. And to your point... have you seen the size of the shoes the kids are wearing today? Holy cow (no pun intended) I'm 35 and in a size 10. Many kids that are 12 and 13 are already in size 13 to 14 shoes. Somethings up with that!
 

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I tend to think that has more natural causes, and more to do with better nutrition than in the past (people are also getting taller). I dont think anything about the cloning process (telomeres, etc) really transfers to someone eating it. It's not an infection or a disease. It doesn't really matter if you eat a young or old cow. You don't worry about inheriting traits of a cow when you eat beef, do you?
 
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